Microgreens: Health Benefits and Recipes for These Supercharged Greens

What are microgreens?
Microgreens are baby plants, harvested when they are about 2" tall.

What do they taste like?
They taste like baby versions of the grown-up plant- so pea microgreens taste sweet like peas and radish microgreens are a little spicy like radishes. 

How are microgreens different than sprouts?
Sprouts are seeds that are germinated in water and eaten with the seed, root, and shoot.  Microgreens are grown in soil and only the above-ground portion is harvested and eaten.

Why should I eat them?
Vitamins and nutrients are much more concentrated in microgreens than they are in regular vegetables.  So a small serving of microgreens will supply just as much if not more nutrition than a larger portion of regular veggies. 
For example:

  • Radish microgreens have 6 times as much vitamin C as regular radishes.
  • Arugula microgreens have 7 times as much beta carotene as regular arugula.
  • Pea microgreens have 10 times as much Vitamin K as regular peas. 
    Source.

Think of it like sprinkling vitamin confetti on your food!

What do you do with them?

  • Add to salads.
  • Add to wraps.
  • Add to sandwiches.
  • Add to smoothies.
  • Use as a garnish on almost anything!

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Salad made with lettuce, microgreens, carrots, bell peppers, turkey, and pine nuts.

A low carb "wrap" made with romaine lettuce (in place of a tortilla), slices of turkey and cheese, sundried tomatoes, microgreens, and ranch dressing.

No lettuce needed for this salad!  I combined broccoli microgreens with bell peppers and cucumbers cut into matchsticks, quartered cherry tomatoes, and drizzled with a simple vinaigrette made with lemon juice, oil, honey, salt and pepper.

Fried egg with microgreens and an heirloom tomato.

Creamed hard boiled eggs on toast topped with microgreens.

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